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HomeEducationMisogynistic signs at Queen's University being "actively pursued" under code of conduct

Misogynistic signs at Queen’s University being “actively pursued” under code of conduct

Last Updated on October 18, 2021 by YGK News Staff

Queen’s University has issued a statement condemning misogynistic signs that were created by some students this weekend. 

The misogynistic signs, which were spray-painted on bedsheets, read messages such as: “lockdown your daughters not Kingston,” and “Western guys wish they were Pfizer so they can get inside her.”

When a bystander Brock Jekill approached to ask the students to take down the sign, one individual responded “This is our private property, if you don’t like it, get the f*ck out of here. I don’t care if you’re offended.”

Several other tenants and visitors were present along with the tenant.

Jekill told YGK News that one individual at the house tried to justify the signs, saying at one point he said he’d either had a close friend or sibling who had “had that stuff happen to her, and she doesn’t care.”

The same tenant, who was also intoxicated, approached the bystander. They began asking “why the hell do you have those [masks] on?” The tenant then physically “ripped” the masks off the bystander.

At one point, the verbally aggressive tenant at the residence stopped trying to justify the sign and proceeded to shove the bystander and engage physically with him. The other tenants held back the intoxicated tenant, though the belligerent tenant hit Jekill anyway.

The signs, first posted by YGK News, immediately drew condemnation from Queen’s students, alumni, and Ontarians alike. 

“I am disgusted and, honestly a little afraid, @queensuniversity hold your students accountable. This is unacceptable,” wrote one student. 

Photo: Gillian Armstrong, YGK News

“Given the high rates of sexual assault at other universities this year, I’m appalled to see this. There is absolutely no excuse for this. @KingstonPolice this needs to be dealt with immediately,” another user wrote. 

The signs prompted one alumna of Queen’s University to immediately report the signs to Queen’s University’s Non-Academic Misconduct system and Kingston bylaw enforcement. 

The misogynistic signs come just two weeks after Queen’s University held a rally in support of victims of sexual assault at Western University and across university campuses in Ontario. 

“It’s happening here,” said Queen student Samantha Lin during a walkout on September 27th. “We all know it. We all talk about it, and we know it. But what we need more is an action piece.”

A campus study released in 2020 found that Queen’s University had the 2nd highest rate of reported sexual harassment in Ontario and the 4th highest incidence of sexual assault.

Queen’s is now promising to actively pursue the actions of students under the university’s Student Code of Conduct.

At the same time, Queen’s University denounced individuals who threw projectiles at police officers on Saturday. The actions of the individuals led to one officer being injured.

By some estimates, there were 8,000 people present at unsanctioned Homecoming gatherings on Saturday. Crowds remained constant until Kingston Police eventually declared Aberdeen and William Street an aggravated nuisance party.

Once an aggravated nuisance party is declared, an individual can be fined a $2,000 monetary fine.

Campus security later removed the signs when it came to their attention.

Update: On October 18th, the following statement was released by Queen’s University Principal and Vice-Chancellor Patrick Deane.

“The signs that appeared on Saturday poison the quality of (the university) environment by unwantedly sexualizing campus life, but more particularly by causing the threat of sexual violence to hang over the heads of women and those vulnerable to harassment and assault in our community,” said Deane.

In the statement, Deane confirmed that action is being taken under the Queen’s Code of Conduct but declined to specify what the action would entail.

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